Energy Storage Technologies

Energy storage plays an important role in balancing power supply and demand, and is key to tackling the intermittency issues of renewable energy. Pairing a storage system with a renewable energy source ensures a smooth and steady power supply, even when weather conditions are not optimal for energy generation. Batteries are the most common storage devices used in renewable energy systems and their use is increasing on both the residential and grid-wide scale. Energy storage technologies  are expected to continue to improve, making their use more viable and affordable. It is projected that storage will represent a core component of all new energy technologies moving into the future, as both utility-scale and domestic energy storage solutions become more price competitive, eroding the advantages of traditional energy sources

Related Societies: Renewable Fuels Association, Rocky Mountain Institute, Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation, World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal, World Bioenergy Association.

Emerging Bioenergy Technologies

We have used Bioenergy for thousands of years, ever since people started burning wood to cook food or to keep warm. And today, wood is still our largest biomass energy resource. But many other sources of biomass can now be used, including plants, residues from agriculture or forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes. Even the fumes from landfills can be used as a biomass energy source.

The use of biomass energy has the potential to greatly reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass generates about the same amount of carbon dioxide as fossil fuels, but every time a new plant grows, carbon dioxide is actually removed from the atmosphere. The net emission of carbon dioxide will be zero as long as plants continue to be replenished for biomass energy purposes. These energy crops, such as fast-growing trees and grasses, are called biomass feedstock’s. The use of biomass feedstock’s can also help increase profits for the agricultural industry.

Related Societies: Iranian Biofuel Society (IBS), International Hydropower Association (IHA) (International), National Hydropower Association (US), Middle East Solar Industry Association (ME Biomass Energy technology applications:

Advanced Utilization and Management of Biogas

Biogas is a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and hydrogen sulphide, the major constituents being methane. Biogas is produced by anaerobic degradation of animal and plant wastes in the presence of water. Anaerobic degradation is to break down the organic matter by bacteria in the absence of oxygen. It is a non-polluting, clean and low cost fuel which is very useful for rural areas. Biogas plants used in our country are of two types; fixed dome biogas plant and floating drum biogas plant.
 
Related Societies: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC), Pellet Fuels Institute, Iranian Biofuel Society (IBS), Renewable Fuels Association, Rocky Mountain Institute, Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation, World Bioenergy Association.

 

Wind Power Technology and Instrumentation

Wind energy is a conversion of wind energy by wind turbines into a useful form, such as electricity or mechanical energy. Wind farms are installed on agricultural land or grazing areas, have one of the lowest environmental impacts of all energy sources. The principal application of wind power today is the generation of electricity, historically; it has been used directly to propel sailing ships or converted into mechanical energy for pumping water or grinding grains.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association , Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Solar Energy Technology

The sun offers an ideal energy source, unlimited in supply, expensive, which does not add to the earth’s total heat burden and does not produce air and water pollutants. Solar installations in recent years have also largely begun to expand into residential areas with government offering incentive programs to make green energy a more economically viable option.

Related Societies: International Solar Energy Society, Solar Cookers International, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), Wadebridge Renewable Energy Network (WREN), American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Hydro and Ocean Power Technology

This is the most widely used form of renewable energy . The gravitation force of falling water is the key point in hydroelectricity generation. Small scale hydro or micro-hydro power has been an increasingly popular alternative energy source, especially in remote areas where other power sources are not viable. The hydro power sites have a few major environmental problems like water logging and siltation, Causes loss to biodiversity of fish population and other aquatic animals. It also displaces local people and creates problems of rehabilitation and related socio-economic problems.

Related Societies:International Hydropower Association (IHA) (International), National Hydropower Association.

Marine Energy/ Tidal Energy

Tidal energy is not a very popular energy source, but has immense potential of becoming one in the near future. Tidal energy can be generated in two ways, tidal stream generators or by barrage generation. The power created through tidal generators is generally environmental friendly and causes less impact on established ecosystems. It is similar to the wind energy. Tidal energy is the only form of energy that derives directly from the motions of the Earth-Moon system. The tidal forces produced by the Moon-Sun in combination with Earth’s rotation are responsible for the tides.

Related Societies:American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW), European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association.

Geothermal Energy

Geothermal energy is the heat from Earth. It’s clean and sustainable. Resources of geothermal energy range from the shallow ground to hot water and hot rock found a few miles beneath the Earth’s surface and down even deeper to the extremely high temperatures of molten rock called magma. The steam or hot water comes out of the cracks in the Earth and when it doesn’t find any way to come out, holes are drilled with pipes in it to gush the hot water out due to high pressure which turn the turbines of a generator to produce electricity.

Related Societies: Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal. World Bioenergy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal.

Compressed Natural Gas

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a substitute for gasoline, diesel or propane fuel. It is cleaner and safer to use as it diffuses easily into the surroundings if leaked. However, burning it does release a few greenhouse gases in the air. CNG is used in traditional gasoline internal combustion engine cars that have been converted into bi-fuel vehicles.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal. World Bioenergy Association

Biofuels/Biodiesel

It is a form of fuel used as a substitute for diesel It is safe, biodegradable, and produces less air pollutants than petroleum-based diesel.Biodiesels meant to be used in standard diesel engines and is thus distinct from the vegetable and used to fuel converted diesel engines.  Biodiesel can be used in pure form, or blended with petro diesel in any proportions. Biodiesel blends can also be used as heating oil. It also can be obtained from Pongamia, field pennycress and jatropha and other crops such as mustard, jojoba, flax, sunflower, palm oil, coconut and hemp. Several economic studies have been conducted regarding the economic impact of  biodiesel production.

Related Societies: Iranian Biofuel Society (IBS), International Hydropower Association (IHA) (International), National Hydropower Association (US), Middle East Solar Industry Association (MESIA).

Green Energy and Environment

Green energy mainly involves natural processes which will be controlled with very little pollution. Anaerobic digestion, geothermic power, wind power, small-scale hydropower, solar power, biomass power, periodic event power, wave power, and a few styles of atomic power belongs to the green energy. Green energy customers either obligates the utility corporations to extend the quantity of green energy that they purchase from the or directly fund the green energy through a green power supplier. Green economy can be defined as an economy that aims at reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. Greenhouse emission because of human action area unit progressively either inflicting global warming or creating global climate change worse.

Related Societies: World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal. World Bioenergy Association.

Waste to Energy Conversion

Waste-to-energy  is the process of generating energy in the form of electricity and/or heat from the primary treatment of waste, or the processing of waste into a fuel source. Waste to Energy is a form of energy recovery. Most Waste to Energy processes generate electricity and/or heat directly through combustion, or produce a combustible fuel commodity, such as methane, methanol, ethanol or synthetic fuels.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal. World Bioenergy Association, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW).

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is the organizing principle for meeting human development goals while simultaneously sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services upon which the economy and society depend. The desired result is a state of society where living conditions and resource are used to continue to meet human needs without undermining the integrity and stability of the natural system. Sustainable development can be defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Renewable Energy and Climate Change

Renewable energy is one of the most effective tools we have in the fight against climate change. As well as having a large potential to mitigate climate change, Renewable energy can provide wider benefits. RE may, if implemented properly, contribute to social and economic development, energy access, a secure energy use is changing fast. The shift to renewable sources, however, needs to happen faster, not just in power generation but in heating, buildings and transport, to check the rise in global temperatures.

Renewables could supply four-fifths of the world’s electricity by 2050, massively cutting carbon emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. But solar and wind power have to be fully integrated, with sustainable bioenergy providing another key part of the mix.

All this means speeding up innovation in business and technology. Above it all, it means taking action to promote renewable energy today. Supply, and reducing negative impacts on the environment and health.

Renewable Fuels Association, Rocky Mountain Institute, Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation, World Council for Renewable Energy, Geothermal Energy Association, Geothermal Resources Council, Iceland Geothermal, World Bioenergy Association.

Renewable and Sustainable Energy

Renewable energy is defined as energy sources that are naturally replenished on a human timescale and renewable energy technologies have been emerged from the industrial revolution in the first generation, at the end of the 19th century and include hydropower, biomass combustion and geothermal power and heat. Second-generation technologies include solar heating and cooling. Third-generation technologies are still under development and include advanced biomass gasification, bio refinery technologies, concentrating solar thermal power, hot dry rock geothermal energy and ocean energy. Sustainable energy is energy that is consumed at insignificant rates and should meet the future generation needs without compromising. Not all renewable energy is sustainable. The organizing principle for sustainability is sustainable development, which includes the four interconnected domains: ecology, economics, politics and culture.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Modern and Alternate Energy

Alternative energy is an alternative to fossil fuel. Wind and hydroelectric power are the direct result of differential heating of the Earth's surface which leads to air moving about and as the air is a lifted precipitation form. Some alternative energy such as solar energy is the conversion of sunlight into electricity using panels or collectors. Biomass energy is stored sunlight contained in plants. Geothermal energy, which is a result of radioactive decay in the crust combined with the original heat of accreting the Earth, and tidal energy is the conversion of gravitational energy. Some modern alternative energy devices have been invented such as Ortarkey chair Solar Boats, Sun Stash Portable Solar Power Charger, The Walk Car and Solar powered fan baseball cap, Solar Fire Starter.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Global Energy Conservation and Management

Energy conservation is a part of the concept of eco-sufficiency. In the year of 2006 the European Union pledged to reduce its annual consumption of primary energy by 20% by 2020. The Petroleum Conservation Research Association (PCRA) is an Indian governmental body created in 1977 that engages in promoting energy efficiency and conservation in every walk of life. Since the 1973 oil crisis, energy conservation has been an issue in Japan. So the domestic sustainable energy is being developed by importing all oil based fuel. The U.S. Department of Energy categorizes national energy use in four broad sectors: transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial. Some other countries over the world have their own prospects about energy conservation.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Environmental and Ecological Effects of Energy Production and Consumption

The environmental impacts associated with solar power can include land use and habitat loss, water use, and the use of hazardous materials in manufacturing, These impacts vary greatly depending on the technology used—photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. Fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—do substantially more harm than renewable energy sources by most measures, including air and water pollution, damage to public health, water use, land use, wildlife and habitat loss, also global warming emissions.

Related Societies: European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Graphene and Nano Technology for Renewable Energy

Graphene is a material that has gathered tremendous popularity in recent years, due to its extraordinary strength and light weight. It can be generated by literally peeling it off from graphite, or by growing it on top of various materials, which makes its production cost-effective. Graphene also has an excellent charge transport property, in which electrons moves at a speed of 1/30 of the speed of light much faster than any other material which opens up more possibilities for Graphene to be used in solar cells. The Nano materials with diameter <100 nm can be used to reduce the size of information processing parts of most usable devices such as cell phones and lap computers. Nano technology is used for renewable energy as the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) solar cells was increased by Nano technology, while their manufacturing and electricity production costs were reduced at an unprecedented rate. Hydrogen production, storage and transformation into electricity in fuel cells were improved by using nanostructured materials.

Related Societies: 
European Wind Energy Association, Global Wind Energy Council, World Wind Energy Association, World Council for Renewable Energy, American Wind Energy Association, Citizen Partnerships for Offshore Wind (CPOW)

Application and Challenges

Traditional fossil-fuel plants operate at a pre-mitigated level, they provide a consistent and predictable amount of electricity. Renewables, on the other hand, are a much more unreliable source. For example, energy output from a solar farm can drop without warning due to clouds obscuring sunlight from the panels. Similarly, wind speeds cannot be reliably forecasted. To prepare for this fluctuation in advance, research and investment into energy storage systems are on the rise.